[Home]History of Fire And Hemlock (Spoilers)

Diana Wynne Jones Wiki Home | RecentChanges | Preferences


Revision 26 . . (edit) April 18, 2010 2:28 pm by Paul A [link]
Revision 25 . . June 16, 2005 12:44 am by cpe-024-025-019-099.nc.res.rr.com
Revision 24 . . June 14, 2005 12:10 pm by cpe-024-025-019-099.nc.res.rr.com
  

Difference (from prior major revision) (minor diff, author diff)

Changed: 41c41
***Thomas Lynn meets Granny; her cat, Mintchoc, runs away from him.
***Thomas Lynn meets Granny; her cat, Mintchoc, runs away from him.

Changed: 146c146
****This magical act of jealousy, Polly realizes later, "opens the way" for Laurel's magical response.
****This magical act of possessiveness, Polly realizes later, "opens the way" for Laurel's magical response.

Changed: 202c202
*DWJ was apparently inspired not only by the "Tam Lin" ballad, but also by the Odyssey. This is hinted at in Mr. Lynn's story of his encounter with the giant (which may only have one eye, like the Cyclops which Odysseus defeats). DWJ's article in the June 1989 issue of The Lion and the Unicorn (not available online) discussed the influence of the Odyssey, which begins with the hero Odysseus in thrall to the nymph Calypso. Shortly after his escape from her island, Odysseus tells the story of his voyage; this flashback comprises much of the epic. The flashback structure, of course, is evident in Fire and Hemlock, but DWJ also saw Odysseus' flashback as the hero's final break with Calypso through a creative act of memory, recalling and telling the story of his trials in order to reclaim his own identity. Storytelling and memory as a means to freedom are major themes in the novel; Thomas Lynn and Polly build a relationship through stories and storytelling, while Polly must reclaim her memories, telling the whole story of the novel to herself, in order to reclaim her own identity as the "Hero."
*DWJ was apparently inspired not only by the "Tam Lin" ballad, but also by the Odyssey. This is hinted at in Mr. Lynn's story of his encounter with the giant (which may only have one eye, like the Cyclops which Odysseus defeats). DWJ's article in the June 1989 issue of The Lion and the Unicorn (not available online) discussed the influence of the Odyssey, which begins with the hero Odysseus in thrall to the nymph Calypso. Shortly after his escape from her island, Odysseus tells the story of his voyage; this flashback comprises much of the epic. The flashback structure, of course, is evident in Fire and Hemlock, but DWJ also saw Odysseus' flashback as the hero's final break with Calypso through a creative act of memory, recalling and telling the story of his trials in order to reclaim his own identity. Storytelling and memory as a means to freedom are major themes in the novel; Thomas Lynn and Polly build a relationship through stories and storytelling, while Polly must reclaim her memories, telling the whole story of the novel to herself, in order to reclaim her own identity as the "Hero."

Diana Wynne Jones Wiki Home | RecentChanges | Preferences
Search:
Anyone can edit the DWJ wiki. To edit the DWJ wiki, edit the Preferences and enter the Administrator password (not the first password field, the second password field) 'cennoreth'.